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Punctuation of Restrictive Clauses

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Punctuation of Restrictive Clauses                                              

Common Core Language Standard 2

The tough “fifty-cent” words we use to describe the academic language of grammar, usage, and mechanics restricts our understanding. To restrict means to keep within certain limits or to not allow beyond a certain area. In grammar we mean that the words and meaning are limited within the clause. In other words no other additional words or meaning beyond the basic meaning of that clause are permitted. Because the clause is restrictive, it needs something to restrict. It needs to connect to an independent clause (a noun and a connected verb expressing a complete thought). The restrictive clause is dependent upon that independent clause, so it is a dependent clause.

Today’s mechanics lesson is on how to punctuate restrictive clauses. Let’s read the mechanics lesson and study the examples.

Now let’s read the mechanics lesson and study the examples.

The relative pronouns who, whom, whose,and that, but not which introduce restrictive clauses. Do not use commas, dashes, or parentheses between nouns and relative pronouns.

Examples: The girl who lives here is kind. The boy whom I just met and whose food we are eating is extremely generous.

Now circle or highlight what is right and revise what is wrong according to mechanics lesson.

Practice: He made me an offer, that I can’t refuse. My friend, whose name is Art, is crazy.

Let’s check the Practice Answers.

Pennington Publishing's Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, Spelling, and Vocabulary (Teaching the Language Strand) Grades 4-8 Programs

Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, Spelling, and Vocabulary (Teaching the Language Strand) Grades 4-8 Programs

Mechanics Practice Answers: He made me an offer that I can’t refuse. My friend, whose name is Art, is crazy.

Now let’s apply what we have learned. 

Writing Application: Write your own sentence using a restrictive relative clause in the middle of the sentence.

This writing opener is part of a comprehensive language conventions lesson from the Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, Spelling, and Vocabulary (Teaching the Language Strand)  Grades 4‒8 programs.  Complete descriptions, instructional scopes and sequences, introductory video, previews, and two-week test drives of the grade-level teacher guides and student workbooks are available here.

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