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Posts Tagged ‘pronoun antecedents’

Vague Pronoun References

Pronouns with Vague References

Vague Pronoun References

Vague Pronoun References         

Play the quick video lesson HERE and click the upper left back arrow to return to this lesson.

Common Core Language Standard 1

Different parts of sentences have to relate to each other to make sense. When it’s unclear how one part of the sentence relates to another, the reader has difficulty understanding what is being said.

Today’s grammar and usage lesson is on vague pronoun references. Remember that a pronoun takes the place of a noun and identifies its antecedent. An antecedent is the noun or pronoun that the pronoun refers to or re-names.

Now let’s read the grammar and usage lesson and study the examples.

Three vague pronoun references have pronouns which do not clearly identify their antecedents:

1. Demonstrative pronouns (this, that, these, or those) are used on their own. Revise by adding a noun following the pronoun. Example: That is beautiful. That painting is beautiful.

2. Plural antecedents match one pronoun. Revise by repeating the noun. Example: He did have pens but we didn’t need any right now. He did have pens but we didn’t need any right now.

3. The antecedent is an adjective. Revise by changing the pronoun reference from an adjective to a noun. Example: I called Jesse’s work Jesse at his work, but he never answered.

Now circle or highlight what is right and revise what is wrong according to grammar and usage lesson.

Practice: Get some paper from your binder and write on it. I like Amy’s friend, but Amy doesn’t.

Let’s check the Practice Answers.

Pennington Publishing's Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, Spelling, and Vocabulary (Teaching the Language Strand) Grades 4-8 Programs

Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, Spelling, and Vocabulary (Teaching the Language Strand) Grades 4-8 Programs

Grammar and Usage Practice Answers: Get some paper from your binder and write on the paper. I like Amy’s friend, but Amy doesn’t.

Now let’s apply what we have learned. 

Writing Application: Write your own sentence using a pronoun antecedent which clearly and specifically matches its antecedent.

This writing opener is part of a comprehensive language conventions lesson from the Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, Spelling, and Vocabulary (Teaching the Language Strand)  Grades 4‒8 programs. Complete descriptions, instructional scopes and sequences, introductory video, previews, and two-week test drives of the grade-level teacher guides and student workbooks are available here.

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