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Short Superlative Modifiers

Using Short Superlative Modifiers

Short Superlative Modifiers

Short Superlative Modifiers       

Play the quick video lesson HERE and click the upper left back arrow to return to this lesson.                            

Common Core Language Standard 1

When we say “super,” we usually mean “great.” For example, “How was the food?” “Super.” Originally, the Latin prefix super meant “above” or “beyond.” Superlative means the best or most. Short superlative modifiers are formed differently than long superlative modifiers.

Today’s grammar and usage lesson is on short superlative modifiers. Remember that a modifier is an adjective or adverb that limits the meaning of a word or words. A comparative modifier compares two things, using the suffix “_er” for one-syllable modifier, more (less) or “_er” for a two-syllable modifier, and more or less for three-syllable (or longer) adjective modifiers and all adverbs ending in “__ly.”

Now let’s read the grammar and usage lesson and study the examples.

Use the suffix “_est” for a one-syllable superlative modifier to compare three or more things. The superlative modifier indicates which is the most or least. Example: greatest

Now circle or highlight what is right and revise what is wrong according to mechanics lesson.

Practice: Of the three swimmers, Jonna was most best, Rose was second best, while Yolanda had the least amount of skill.

Pennington Publishing's Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, Spelling, and Vocabulary (Teaching the Language Strand) Grades 4-8 Programs

Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, Spelling, and Vocabulary (Teaching the Language Strand) Grades 4-8 Programs

Let’s check the Practice Answers.

Grammar and Usage Practice Answers: Of the three swimmers, Jonna was best, Rose was second best, while Yolanda had the least amount of skill.

Now let’s apply what we have learned. 

Writing Application: Write your own sentence using a one-syllable superlative modifier to compare three or more things.

This writing opener is part of a comprehensive language conventions lesson from the Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, Spelling, and Vocabulary (Teaching the Language Strand)  Grades 4‒8 programs. Complete descriptions, instructional scopes and sequences, introductory video, previews, and two-week test drives of the grade-level teacher guides and student workbooks are available here.

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